Review Nov. 29 Story of the ‘Ukulele and Concert

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The Hawaiian Serenaders presented “Story of the ‘Ukulele and Concert” at Hana Public and School Library on Nov. 29. There were 129 people including 80 1st to 5th graders who attended.

“Thank you again for such a wonderful performance, the children were still talking about it today.” –´Irene, branch librarian via Facebook.

The Hawaiian Serenaders, comprised of my husband Rich on u-bass and myself on ‘ukulele and vocals, presented “Story of the ‘Ukulele and Concert” at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, November 29 at Hana Public and School Library. We were so pleased to have 129 people including 80 1st to 5th graders attend our program. We specifically added 4 Christmas songs the children would know so we could do a sing-along. The best moment was after our program when a teacher played my ‘ukulele and the children sang a song for us – it brought tears to our eyes – the sound of children’s voices were so moving.

Here is the song list including 4 Christmas sing-along songs to engage the children:

  1. Koni Au I Ka Wai – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (history-King Kalakaua patronage)
  2. Puamana – I Wanna Rest Strum (started as rhythm accompaniment to singers & hula dancers)*
  3. Jingle Bells – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (sing-along In English and Hawaiian)
  4. Uwehi Ami & Slide – I Wanna Rest Strum (merging instrumental picking into local song)
  5. Bill Bailey – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (Dixieland jazz & banjo uke example)
  6. Silent Night – Pick in 6 Strum (sing-along in English and Hawaiian in 6/8 time example)
  7. Lahaina – Latin Strum (pop with audience sing-along example)
  8. Ulupalakua – Olapa Strum (Hawaiian place name song with English translation)*
  9. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (sing-along)
  10. Medley: Yes Sir/Five Foot Two/Baby Face – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (1920s banjo uke example)
  11. Mele Kalikimaka – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (Hawaii’s way to say Merry Christmas)
  12. Hawaii Aloha – Morse Code Strum (traditional ending to events in Hawaii)
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The Hawaiian Serenaders are artists available through the University of Hawai’i Statewide Cultural Extension Program.

The educational program was funded in part by the University of Hawai’i Statewide Cultural Extension Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Hawai’i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. The Hawaiian Serenaders are artists available through the UH program. There is no cost to the audience and we got paid – a win win for everyone. Note: This gig was part of our 3 ‘ukulele shows in 3 Days in November – just the way the scheduling worked out (Read more).

About the trip: The long and windy road to Hana was made more challenging this trip because of the rainy conditions. The waterfalls were gushing and in many spots the rain water was running down the sides of the roads. We arrived safely at the library after a 2-hour drive (we left home at 9 a.m.). The librarian was so happy to see us as “it’s hard to get entertainers down here.” Luckily the rain stopped long enough for us to unload our equipment into the library. It was 5 p.m. by the time we arrived home – making a long, but worthwhile day.

For more information about our entertainment services:

.Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review Nov. 28 Story of the ‘Ukulele and Concert

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The Hawaiian Serenaders presented Story of the ‘Ukulele and Concert on Nov. 28 at Kahului Library. Beverly Romias danced.

“Mele and her husband present a wonderful workshop and concert,” commented Georgia Hunter in part of an email introduction to a ‘ukulele company in Vancouver, B.C.

The Hawaiian Serenaders, comprised of my husband Rich on u-bass and myself on ‘ukulele and vocals, presented “Story of the ‘Ukulele and Concert” at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, November 28 at Kahului Library. Nine people attended including two from Canada.

Total: 11 songs including 2 with Beverly Romias dancing hula*

  1. Koni Au I Ka Wai – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (history-King Kalakaua patronage)
  2. Puamana – I Wanna Rest Strum (started as rhythm accompaniment to singers & hula dancers)*
  3. Girl From Ipanema – Bossa Nova Strum (jazz & u-bass solo example)
  4. Bill Bailey – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (Dixieland jazz & banjo uke example)
  5. Uwehi Ami & Slide – I Wanna Rest Strum (merging instrumental picking into local song)
  6. Could I Have This Dance – 2 Waltz Strums (country & 3/4 time example)
  7. Lahaina – Latin Strum (pop with audience sing-along example)
  8. Ulupalakua – Olapa Strum (Hawaiian place name song with English translation)*
  9. Medley: Yes, Sir/Five Foot Two/Baby Face – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (1920’s banjo uke example)
  10. Blues in the Night – 4And Strum (blues and change to uke with high G for riff example)
  11. Mele Kalikimaka – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (Hawaii’s way to say Merry Christmas)

The educational program was funded in part by the University of Hawai’i Statewide Cultural Extension Program, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Hawai’i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. The Hawaiian Serenaders are artists with the UH program. There is no cost to the audience and we got paid – a win win for everyone. Note: This gig was part of our 3 ‘ukulele shows in 3 Days in November – just the way the scheduling worked out (Read more).

For more information about our entertainment services:

.Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review Nov 30 Story of the Ukulele and Concert

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The Hawaiian Serenaders – Richard Tom and Mele Fong- performed Nov. 30 at Wailuku Library. Beverly danced hula.

The Hawaiian Serenaders presented “Story of the ‘Ukulele and Concert” at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 30 at Wailuku Public Library. This was our third gig in three days at three different libraries (Read more). The educational program was free to the public and we were paid funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Hawai’i’ State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, and the University of Hawai’i Statewide Cultural Extension Program.

“I’m a fan,” said one lady whom I recognized from previous programs. Marilyn attended our programs at Kihei Library, Kahului Library, and Wailuku Library this year. She has also taken ‘ukulele classes from me during the summer (when she’s not working) at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better.

We were disappointed in the low turnout – four people – especially after performing the previous day for 129 people at Hana Public Library. One lady came 1-hour early at 5:30 p.m. just after we arrived to setup. One lady called from Kihei to confirm the event was happening and then showed up. Regardless of the size of the audience, we presented our best as the show goes on.

We encountered one snafu before the show. Good thing we arrived 1-hour early because that is when the librarian told us the sound guy was sick and would not be bringing his equipment. Unfortunately, that meant Rich had to drive home to get his bass amp so his u-bass could be heard. We did not bring the amp with us since we had planned to plug into the sound guy’s equipment. The road was slick with rain so I reminded Rich to drive safely during the 35-minute drive home and then back. Thus, I started the program without Rich and then he joined in when he arrived.

Here is our 45-minute show set (11 songs including 2 with Beverly Romias dancing hula*):

  1. Koni Au I Ka Wai – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (history-King Kalakaua patronage)
  2. Puamana – I Wanna Rest Strum (started as rhythm accompaniment to singers & hula dancers)*
  3. Girl From Ipanema – Bossa Nova Strum (jazz & u-bass solo example)
  4. Bill Bailey – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (Dixieland jazz & banjo uke example)
  5. Uwehi Ami & Slide – I Wanna Rest Strum (merging instrumental picking into local song)
  6. Could I Have This Dance – 2 Waltz Strums (country & 3/4 time example)
  7. Lahaina – Latin Strum (pop with audience sing-along example)
  8. Ulupalakua – Olapa Strum (Hawaiian place name song with English translation)*
  9. Medley: Yes, Sir/Five Foot Two/Baby Face – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (1920’s banjo uke example)
  10. Blues in the Night – 4And Strum (blues and change to uke with high G for riff example)
  11. Mele Kalikimaka – Hum Ding-Ah Strum (Hawaii’s way to say Merry Christmas).

Visit The Hawaiian Serenaders webpage for audio samples and more.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review November Ukulele Strumming Workshop

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November 18 was the 43rd Ukulele Strumming Workshop and has served 526 since it began on July 14, 2012

“We truly enjoyed your class on Saturday,” said J. Clark after coming to her first workshop with her husband.

Six people attended my 43rdUkulele Strumming Workshop on November 18 bringing the total to 526 served since the workshops began on July 14, 2012. The one visitor from Canada had taken lessons and workshops from me previously. One of the new participants had won a free ukulele during the giveaways last Saturday, November 11 at the 10th Annual Maui Ukulele Guild Exhibition and had also seen us perform with two groups on stage.

Most of the attendees were local Maui residents experiencing their first ukulele lesson with me. Many were new ‘ukulele players so we spent time on the fundamentals of how to hold the instrument, form basic chords with minimal muscle strain, and strum easy strums taught by no one else.

We had fun playing the following songs:

  1. Horse with No Name – 2-chords with Chalang-Alang Strum.
  2. Lion Sleeps Tonight – 3-chords with Chalang-Alang strum.
  3. She’ll Be Comin’ ‘Round the Mountain – 3-chords with Hum Ding-Ah Strum
  4. Hawaii Aloha – 4-chords with Morse Code Strum.

Plus, I demonstrated other strums to the same song and how applying the different rhythms affect the mood of what you want to express. In other words, there is more than one way to play a song and you are in the driver’s seat to convey the feeling by the way you play the strum.

Register now for the next Ukulele Strumming Workshop on Saturday, December 16 at 10 a.m. at the Bailey House in Wailuku.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review 10th Maui Ukulele Guild Exhibition

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Richard Tom and Mele Fong led 10 Maui Ukulele Pops Band members in performing at the 10th Annual Maui Ukulele Guild Exhibition on November 11 at Queen Kaahumanu Center

My husband and I led the performance of 10 Maui Ukulele Pops Band members on stage this year at the 10th Annual Maui Ukulele Guild Exhibition on Nov. 11, 2017 at Queen Ka’ahumanu Center in Kahului. Band members were: Andrea, Beverly, Claudia, Eileen, Ellen, Holly, Kathleen, Linda, Maricruz, and Sandy who sat in one row on stage. New this year, every person wore gold garland leis made years ago by Faith a former member. The leis added a sparkle to our Band formal attire of white or pink long muumuu for women and black pants with white aloha shirts for men. I am proud of my students as they sounded great as we played our unique repertoire of Hawaiian, hapa haole, and pop songs with different strums. Beverly danced hula to one song. “Everyone looked like they were having fun,” commented a spectator after our performance.

Here is the Maui Ukulele Pops Band’s 30-minute set with the name of the strum:

  1. Medley: Yes Sir/Five Foot Two/Baby Face – Hum Ding-Ah Strum
  2. Dahil Sa Iyo (in Filipino) – Bossa Nova Strum
  3. Ka Ulu Wehi O Ke Kai (in Hawaiian) – Latin Strum, plus hula by Beverly
  4. Proud Mary – Tom Tom Strum
  5. Medley: Tiny Bubbles/Pearly Shells (in English and Hawaiian) – Hum Ding-Ah Strum, 2 keys
  6. Que Sera, Sera – 2 Waltz Strums: Chicken Pluck/Thumb Strum Up
  7. Sukiyaki (in Japanese) – Hum Ding-Ah Strum
  8. Lahaina – Latin Strum
  9. Be My Baby – Boom Shaka I Wanna Strum
  10. Medley: La Bamba/Twist and Shout (in English and Spanish) – Latin Strum
www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Maui Ukulele Jazz Trio, comprised of Richard Tom, Mele Fong, and new member Leilani performed at the Exhibition

This year my husband and I added a new member to our Maui Ukulele Jazz Trio. We discovered Leilani when she came to our house on Sept. 29 to audio record two traditional Hawaiian songs for the Ahahui Ka’ahumanu (we are both members) and afterwards we jammed to songs from our jazz repertoire. We were amazed at how good we sounded and wondered how much better we’d sound after practicing together. I originally formed the Maui Ukulele Jazz Trio in 2012 to play difficult songs without having to teach them – the joy of playing music is my play time. We had fun!

Here is the Maui Ukulele Jazz Trio’s 30-minute set with name of the strum:

  1. Uwehi Ami and Slide – fast jazzy strum with instrumentals to In the Mood
  2. Autumn Leaves – I Wanna Rest/Bossa Nova Strums
  3. L.O.V.E. – Boom Chick Strum.
  4. Somewhere in Hawaii – Latin Strum.
  5. More – Bossa Nova Strum.
  6. Could I Have This Dance – 2 Waltz Strums.
  7. Sway – Bossa Nova Strum.
  8. Kuu Home O Kahaluu – Latin Strum.
  9. Flying – Bossa Nova Strum.
  10. Fly Me To The Moon – Latin Strum.
www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Ukulele Mele on Maui’s first private student in November 2011, Susie from CA, came to the exhibition to say hello

All Maui Ukulele Pops Band members and the new third member of our Maui Ukulele Jazz Trio take my classes at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. This once a year opportunity to perform our music in public is a treat. Hinano (one of my former students), as president of the Maui Ukulele Guild (organization of builders), said this was his last year as coordinator of the event.

When we first arrived at 9:30 a.m. at Queen Ka’ahumanu Center, we were surprised to learn that Hinano was absent (turns out health reasons). Kathy Collins did a great job as MC and the show went on. Benny ran 15-minutes late with his Kalama Intermediate School group which pushed all the other groups back. After our last performance on stage ended at 3:20 p.m. we packed up our display table and called it a day.

Read about the program lineup of community and school groups who performed.

One of the benefits of participating in this annual event has been the opportunity to talk to new people at my Ukulele Mele On Maui display table and to talk to ukulele players who play with other groups that I only see once a year. I was excited when Susie, my very first student who took private lessons at the Bailey House in November 2011 was back in town (she lives in California) and stopped by to say hello and listen to us perform. We participated in seven of the 10 events through the years and don’t know what will happen next year. Stay tuned.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

 

Review American Classics Sing-Along Songs 2017

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Fourteen people signed up for the Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – American Classics program on November 2

“I’ve come to your Hawaiian programs and thought I’d give this a try”, commented a woman originally from Georgia.

Fourteen people signed up for my monthly Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – American Classics on Thursday, November 2, 2017 at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. We sang all 12 songs that we had planned for the program including Hawai’i Aloha (in the Hawaiian language) that is traditionally sung to end a public event in Hawai’i.

The “Sing-Along with Mitch Miller” format of projecting the song lyrics and ‘ukulele chords on a screen at the front of the room, and having my husband provide the u-bass line to fill in the lower tones to the higher pitched ‘ukulele worked great! This time we were in a regular classroom instead of the large multi-purpose room which meant I did not need a sound system to project my voice or to amplify my instrument. Thus, the vocal harmonies of all the singers in the room could be easily heard. The intimate setting worked great!

Here are the 12 songs with my unique ‘ukulele strums that we played:

  1. Medley: Beer Barrel Polka/Tavern in the Town – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  2. Medley: Happy Days Are Here Again/Ain’t She Sweet – Tom Tom/I Wanna Rest Strums.
  3. Red Sails in the Sunset – Latin Strum.
  4. Five Foot Two Eyes of Blue – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  5. Sloop John B – Latin Strum.
  6. Medley: Daisy Bell/Sidewalks of New York – 2 Waltz Strums.
  7. Yes Sir, That’s My Baby – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  8. Jamaica Farewell – Latin Strum.
  9. Baby Face – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  10. Let Me Call You Sweetheart – 2 Waltz Strums.
  11. Swanee – Tom Tom Strum.
  12. Hawaii Aloha – Morse Code Strum.

HERE’S HOW TO LEARN THE ABOVE SONGS FROM WHEREVER YOU LIVE:

LISTEN TO THE RECORDINGS IN THE FREE ONLINE FAN CLUB and then schedule private lessons on Maui or via webcam to get the song sheets and feedback.

  • From the Pop Songs Category – All songs but Sloop John B, Medley: Daisy Bell/Sidewalks of New York, Let Me Call You Sweetheart, and Swanee.

DOWNLOAD A SINGLE SONG PURCHASE to your digital device. Get the song sheets, video lesson, audio recording, and video story behind the song for the song you select.

PURCHASE A PACKAGED SONG SET OF BOOK/DVD/CD. Get the song sheets, video lesson, and audio recording for 6 songs with 8 unique strumming styles.

  1. Sing-Along Songs, Vol. 1 – Jamaica Farewell plus 5 other songs for beginning ‘ukulele players.
  2. Sing-Along Songs, Vol. 2 – Sloop John B, Medley: Daisy Bell/Sidewalks of New York plus 4 other songs for beginning ‘ukulele players.
  3. Nostalgic Hawaiian Songs, Vol. 2 – Hawai’i Aloha plus 5 other songs for intermediate ‘ukulele players.
  4. Hapa Haole Songs, Vol. 1 – Let Me Call You Sweetheart plus 5 other songs for advanced ‘ukulele players.

Stay tuned for the next Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – Christmas Songs Hawaiian Style – as part of the annual Ukulele Mele Christmas Party on Wednesday, December 20.

Visit my webpage about classes at Kaunoa and see photos from past classes for more information.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review Ukulele Workshop October 2017

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Ukulele Strumming Workshop started the sixth season on October 21 at the Bailey House

“Now I feel confident I can do it!” commented a new student after my workshop.

Five out of eight people who pre-registered for my ‘Ukulele Strumming Workshop showed up on October 21, 2017 from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. at Hale Ho’ike’ike at the Bailey House in Wailuku. Two of the participants live in California and had attended workshops and private lessons in the past. We started the sixth season of workshops with a change in length from 2-hours to 1-hour and kept the fee unchanged at $10 or $5 for museum members. This brings the total to 520 participants since the first workshop began on July 14, 2012.

We had fun playing the following songs without looking at music:

  1. Are You Sleeping? – 1-chord with all down strums
  2. Happy Birthday – 3 chords with up and down Chalang-Alang strum.
  3. Lion Sleeps Tonight – 3-chords with Chalang-Alang strum.
  4. She’ll Be Comin’ ‘Round the Mountain – 3-chords with Hum Ding-Ah Strum
  5. Sloop John B – 3-chords with Latin Strum
  6. The More We Get Together – 2-chords with basic Waltz Strum

Plus, I demonstrated other strums to the same song and how applying the different rhythms affect the mood of what you want to express. In other words, there is more than one way to play a song and you are in the driver’s seat to convey the feeling by the way you play the strum.

After the workshop, I found out that two of the local residents were age eligible for Kaunoa Senior Center and so I told them how to sign up for the monthly newsletter with over 12-pages of activities to choose from. My next beginner ‘ukulele classes at Kaunoa will start in January 2018. Click here to visit my Kaunoa webpage of classes offered for adults 55 and better.

Register now for the next Ukulele Strumming Workshop on Saturday, November 18 at 10 a.m. at the Bailey House in Wailuku.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Serenader Show and Ukulele Lesson at Grand Wailea

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The Hawaiian Serenaders entertained at the Grand Wailea on October 12 for a corporate incentive event

“Thank you for your music” and “You are a good teacher” were some of the comments received after our 2-hour gig including a group ukulele lesson from 5 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, October 12 at the Grand Wailea.

The Hawaiian Serenaders, comprised of my husband Rich on u-bass and myself on ‘ukulele and vocals, entertained 125 people attending their corporate incentive event opening reception. Originally planned to be outside on the Chapel Lawn, the event was moved last minute to the paved covered area outside the ballrooms because of the threat of rain. We were so thankful for this change in venue. We setup our Bose PA system and debut matching headsets which eliminated the need for mics, mic chords, and mic stands.

We were hired because the client found our webpage and forwarded a request to the event planner who then contacted us. They liked our flexibility of providing entertainment and group ukulele lessons if requested. We rented instruments from Mele Ukulele Store in the nearby Shops at Wailea for the group lesson. Since the client did not want to do a pre-signup for lessons, we had no idea how many people would be interested. We were happy when 10 people suddenly appeared and wanted a lesson. In fact, we stayed 30-minutes past our contract time to provide the ukulele lesson. No problem.

Here is the mix of music we performed during the entertainment portion of the program:

  1. Kupa Landing
  2. Hanalei Moon
  3. Medley: Tiny Bubbles/Pearly Shells
  4. Hula o Makee
  5. Lahainaluna
  6. On The Beach at Waikiki
  7. Ka Ulu Wehi O Ke Kai
  8. Medley: Maui Waltz/Pua Lilia
  9. Under the Boardwalk/Palm Tree
  10. Papalina Lahilahi
  11. Lahaina
  12. Lovely Hula Hands
  13. Ulupalakua
  14. Fly Me To The Moon
  15. Girl From Ipanema
  16. Puamana
  17. In A Little Hula Heaven

Many of my arrangements for the songs we performed can be found in my free online Fan Club. Listen to over 100 songs you can learn to play the Ukulele Mele Way with private lessons on Maui or via webcam. No one else teaches my method of forming ‘ukulele chords with minimal muscle strain or strumming unique rhythms on the ‘ukulele.

For more information about our entertainment services:

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Serenader Hula Show for Women Helping Women

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The Hawaiian Serenaders had 6 hula dancers for our show at the Women Helping Women event on October 14

“Do you have a CD? ” and “Your voice is so good” were some of the comments received after our 1-hour show with 6 hula dancers from 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. on Saturday, October 14 at Queen Ka’ahumanu Center in Kahului.

The Hawaiian Serenaders, comprised of my husband Rich on u-bass and myself on ‘ukulele and vocals, entertained people attending the Women Helping Women-Domestic Violence Prevention event. We were there because one of my ukulele students who dances hula asked us to play music so her hula sisters from Na Kupuna of Kaunoa could participate in the event. It’s for a good cause, so we agreed. We offered our house for one rehearsal together on Monday, October 9 which was the first time we met most of the dancers. The ladies take hula classes from kumu Lucky Cabral at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better (where I also teach ukulele classes and more). After the program, we were treated to lunch with the ladies which was good fun, too.

At the Center we met the new sound person, Kealoha, a young woman who told us she proposed to management the purchase of a new digital sound system – hurray! It is expected to arrive next year. The acoustics around center stage bounces all over the open space so a new sound system with better directed speakers will be a welcome change.

Here is the mix of music we performed (same set we did for Thursday gig at the Grand Wailea):

  1. Kupa Landing
  2. Hanalei Moon – with hula
  3. Medley: Tiny Bubbles/Pearly Shells
  4. Hula o Makee – with hula
  5. Lahainaluna
  6. On The Beach at Waikiki
  7. Ka Ulu Wehi O Ke Kai – with hula
  8. Medley: Maui Waltz/Pua Lilia
  9. Under the Boardwalk/Palm Tree
  10. Papalina Lahilahi – with hula
  11. Lahaina
  12. Lovely Hula Hands
  13. Ulupalakua – with hula
  14. Fly Me To The Moon
  15. Girl From Ipanema
  16. Puamana – with hula

Many of my arrangements for the songs we performed can be found in my free online Fan Club. Listen to over 100 songs you can learn to play the Ukulele Mele Way with private lessons on Maui or via webcam. No one else teaches my method of forming ‘ukulele chords with minimal muscle strain or strumming unique rhythms on the ‘ukulele.

For more information about our entertainment services:

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review Na Lani Eha Sing-Along Program 2017

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October’s Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series theme was “Na Lani Eha.” We sang a Hawaiian song from each of the four royal composers known collectively as Na Lani Eha, plus hapa haole songs in between.

“I’d like to take ‘ukulele lessons from you, but I am a caregiver for my mom so it’s hard for me to get away,” commented a lady after my monthly Sing-Along program. No problem. I told her to visit my website and take online lessons from home at her convenience.

New this month, we led a spontaneous play-by-ear session to “Lion Sleeps Tonight” and “My Girl” for ‘ukulele players who came early to the program. My ‘Ukulele Strumming Workshop season starts this month on October 21 at the Bailey House in Wailuku and these two songs are what we have played at past workshops because they are familiar to sing and easy to play with 3-chords of C, F, and G7.

Twenty people signed up for my monthly Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – Na Lani Eha and more on Thursday, October 5 at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. We sang a Hawaiian song from each of the four royal composers known collectively as Na Lani Eha, plus a hapa haole song (in English) in between. The composers were also siblings: David Kalākaua (oldest brother), Lili’uokalani (oldest sister), Miriam Likelike (younger sister), and Lot Leleiohōku (youngest) who lived in the 1800s-early 1900s. They helped to perpetuate Hawaiian music and culture and are patrons of the Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame.

The “Sing-Along with Mitch Miller” format of projecting the song lyrics and ‘ukulele chords on a screen at the front of the room, and having my husband provide the u-bass line to fill in the lower tones to the higher pitched ‘ukulele worked great!

Here are the 9 songs we learned:

  1. By Kalākaua – Koni Au I Ka Wai – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  2. Singing Bamboo – Latin Strum.
  3. By Lili’uokalani – Sanoe – 2 Waltz Strums.
  4. Lovely Hula Hands – I Wanna Rest Strum.
  5. By Likelike – Ku’uipo I Ka He’e Pu’e One – Pick in 4/Latin Strums.
  6. Hukilau – Swing Strum.
  7. By Leleiohōku – Hawaiian War Chant – I Wanna Rest /Latin Strums.
  8. Song of Old Hawaii – Swing Strums
  9. Hawaii Aloha – Morse Code Strum.

HERE’S HOW TO LEARN THE ABOVE SONGS FROM WHEREVER YOU LIVE:

LISTEN TO THE RECORDINGS IN THE FREE ONLINE FAN CLUB and then schedule private lessons on Maui or via webcam to get the song sheets and feedback.

DOWNLOAD A SINGLE SONG PURCHASE to your digital device. Get the song sheets, video lesson, audio recording, and video story behind the song for the song you select.

Stay tuned for the next Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – American Classics on Thursday, November 2 at Kaunoa Senior Center.

Visit my webpage about classes at Kaunoa and see photos from past classes for more.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele