Sing Flower and Lei Songs for May

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Join in singing flower and lei songs to celebrate May Day is Lei Day (May 1st) for the monthly Sing-Along with Mele Fong series on May 3 on Maui.

Join in singing flower and lei songs to celebrate May Day is Lei Day (May 1st) for the monthly Sing-Along with Mele Fong series on Thursday, May 3 from 10 a.m. – noon at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better on Maui.

My sing-along program is one of a monthly series that evokes the feeling of sing-along with Mitch Miller programs as the lyrics and ‘ukulele chords are projected on the large screen in the front of room for everyone to follow. ‘Ukulele players are invited to bring instruments to play along as I lead everyone by singing and playing my ‘ukulele while my husband accompanies us on ‘ukulele-bass. Don’t worry if you don’t know the ‘ukulele chords or the unique strumming pattern for the songs. The focus is on singing the songs, finding out the stories behind them, and enjoying the group experience.

Why are people returning? “It’s fun!” is what I’ve heard.

Lunch is optional and recommended as a good time to meet people who enjoy learning the Ukulele Mele Way. Kaunoa Senior Center is located in Spreckelsville, Maui.

SIGN UP NOW by calling 808-270-7308.

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Other learning options with Ukulele Mele:

Whether you are a beginnerintermediate, or advanced ‘ukulele player, you can have fun learning to play the Ukulele Mele Way from wherever you live!

Aloha, Mele Fong, aka Ukulele Mele

Review Hula Songs Sing-Along Program

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

June Jones visiting from Arizona commented how excited she was to take ukulele classes again from Mele Fong after many years. Photo shows Richard Tom (Mele’s husband), Mele Fong, and June Jones at the start of the monthly “Sing-Along with Mele Fong” series at Kaunoa Senior Center on Maui.

“Singing these songs brought back memories of my sister learning hula when we were growing up,” commented one lady after the Hula Songs program. June Jones visiting from Arizona commented how excited she was to take ukulele classes again from Mele Fong after many years.

Twenty-three people signed up for my monthly Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – Hula Songs on Thursday, April 5, 2018 at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better on Maui.

During the new “Hawaiian history moment of the month” I talked about April 1-7 being the 55th Annual Merrie Monarch Festival, a week-long event in Hilo, Hawai’i that features an internationally acclaimed hula competition and more dedicated to the memory of King David Kalākaua, also known as the “Merrie Monarch” for his fun loving ways and support of Hawaiian music and hula. Read more by clicking here.

The “Sing-Along with Mitch Miller” format of projecting the song lyrics and ‘ukulele chords on a screen at the front of the room, and having my husband provide the u-bass line to fill in the lower tones to the higher pitched ‘ukulele worked great! New for this program I changed the graphic layout, background color, and font to Arial after learning this font is the easiest to read at a distance. These changes were in addition to a slide showing the strum graphic and ukulele chord shape images before each song. We continued the routine of learning how to pronounce any Hawaiian words in the songs, the story behind each song whether it was Hawaiian or not, and playing each song twice to reinforce what we learned.

We sang all ten songs that we had prepared for the 75-minute program including Hawai’i Aloha (in the Hawaiian language) that is traditionally sung to end a public event in Hawai’i. Here is the song list with my unique ‘ukulele strums:

  1. Keep Your Eyes on the Hands – I Wanna Rest Strum and 4And Strum.
  2. Papalina Lahilahi – ‘Ōlapa Strum.
  3. Hula Lolo – I Wanna Rest Strum and 4And Strum.
  4. Ka Ulu Wehi O Ke Kai – Latin Strums.
  5. Hukilau Song – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  6. E Huli Makou – ‘Ōlapa Strum.
  7. My Little Grass Shack – I Wanna Rest Strum.
  8. Sophisticated Hula – Boom Shaka I Wanna Strum.
  9. Lovely Hula Hands – I Wanna Rest and 4And Strum.
  10. Hawaii Aloha – Morse Code Strum.

HERE’S HOW UKULELE PLAYERS CAN LEARN THE ABOVE SONGS FROM WHEREVER YOU LIVE:

LISTEN TO THE RECORDINGS IN THE FREE ONLINE FAN CLUB and then schedule private lessons on Maui or via webcam to get the song sheets and feedback on how to play it.

  1. From the Hawaiian Songs Category – E Huli Makou, Ka Ulu Wehi O Ke Kai, and Papalina Lahilahi.
  2. From the Hapa Haole Songs Category – Hukilau Song, Hula Lolo, Keep Your Eyes on the Hands, Lovely Hula Hands, My Little Grass Shack, and Sophisticated Hula.
  3. See all categories of songs with over 100+ audio recordings that you can sing and play along with professional entertainers on voice, ukulele, and ukulele-bass.

DOWNLOAD A SINGLE SONG PURCHASE to your digital device. Get the song sheets, video lesson, audio recording, and video story behind the song for only the song you select.

  1. Hawaii Aloha
  2. See all Single Song Purchases

PURCHASE A PACKAGED SONG SET OF BOOK/DVD/CD. Get the song sheets, video lesson, and audio recording for 6 songs with 8 unique strumming styles for beginners to advance ukulele players.

  1. Nostalgic Hawaiian Songs, Vol. 2 – Hawai’i Aloha plus 5 other songs for intermediate ‘ukulele players.
  2. See all packaged song sets

Stay tuned for the next Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – Flower and Lei Songs on Thursday, May 3.

Visit my webpage about classes at Kaunoa and see photos from past classes for more information.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Sing Hula Songs on April 5, 2018

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Hula songs to celebrate the 55th Annual Merrie Monarch Festival from April 1-7 at Hilo, Hawaii is the theme for this month’s Sing-Along with Mele Fong series on Thursday, April 5, 2018 from 10 a.m. to noon at Kaunoa Senior Center on Maui.

Hula songs to celebrate the 55th Annual Merrie Monarch Festival from April 1 -7 at Hilo, Hawaii is the theme for this month’s Sing-Along with Mele Fong series on Thursday, April 5 from 10 a.m. – noon at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better on Maui.  Learn more about the Merrie Monarch Festival by clicking here.

My sing-along program is one of a monthly series that evokes the feeling of sing-along with Mitch Miller programs as the lyrics and ‘ukulele chords are projected on the large screen in the front of room for everyone to follow. ‘Ukulele players are invited to bring instruments to play along as I lead everyone by singing and playing my ‘ukulele while my husband accompanies us on ‘ukulele-bass. Don’t worry if you don’t know the ‘ukulele chords or the unique strumming pattern for the songs. The focus is on singing the songs, finding out the stories behind them, and enjoying the group experience.

Why are people returning? “It’s fun!” is what I’ve heard.

Lunch is optional and recommended as a good time to meet people who enjoy learning the Ukulele Mele Way. Kaunoa Senior Center is located in Spreckelsville, Maui.

SIGN UP NOW by calling 808-270-7308.

**********************************************************

Other learning options with Ukulele Mele:

Whether you are a beginnerintermediate, or advanced ‘ukulele player, you can have fun learning to play the Ukulele Mele Way from wherever you live!

Aloha, Mele Fong, aka Ukulele Mele

History Behind the Merrie Monarch Festival

“Hula is the language of the heart, therefore the heartbeat of the Hawaiian people” — King David Kalākaua.

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

The 55th Annual Merrie Monarch Festival is April 1-7 in Hilo, Hawaii. The week-long event features an internationally acclaimed hula competition and is dedicated to King David Kalakaua, a patron of the arts.

This year marks the 55th Annual Merrie Monarch Festival, a week-long event in Hilo, Hawai’i that features an internationally acclaimed hula competition, invitational Hawaiian arts fair and grand parade dedicated to the memory of King David Kalākaua, also known as the “Merrie Monarch.” The festival is held annually during the week after Easter, this year being April 1-7.

The Hawai’i Island Chamber of Commerce began the festival in 1963 to perpetuate, preserve, and promote the art of hula and the Hawaiian culture. Five years later, a community non-profit organization was formed “that honors the legacy of King David Kalākaua, who inspired the perpetuation of our traditions, native language and arts.”

Kalākaua was the seventh and last king of the Hawaiian Nation. He was elected in 1874 and reigned until he died in 1891. During his day, Hawaiian beliefs and traditions were suppressed after many years under Christian missionary teachings. Ancient Hawaiians had no written language and used chants and hula to record such things as genealogy and to pass on stories. Kalākaua was a patron of the arts, especially music and dance, and advocated for a renewed sense in all things Hawaiian. At Kalākaua’s royal coronation in 1883, there were public displays of hula for the first time since the missionaries’ arrival in 1820. In 1886, Kalākaua celebrated his 50th birthday known as the Silver Jubilee with two-weeks of festivities including chant and hula dancers performing in public. Every year the Merrie Monarch Festival continues what King David Kalākaua started by hosting a week-long festival to show Hawaiian cultural pride is alive and well in Hilo, Hawai’i.

Kalākaua was also a supporter of ‘ukulele playing. In 1879, three fine wood craftsmen from Madeira, an island off Portugal, immigrated to Hawai’i and brought with them the braguiha or machete that evolved into what we know today as Hawai’i’s official instrument, the ‘ukulele.

‘Ukulele players can keep Hawaiian music alive by learning Hawaiian songs and stories the Ukulele Mele Way by clicking here.

 

Singers and ‘ukulele players are invited to my monthly “Sing-Along with Mele Fong” series with the theme of hula songs in honor of the Merrie Monarch Festival on Thursday, April 5 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon at Kaunoa Senior Center in Maui. Write me for information.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

March Birthdays of Hawaiian Royalty

In March, Hawai’i celebrates the birthdays of two alii (royalty): Queen Ka’ahumanu (March 17, 1768-June 5, 1832) and Prince Kuhio (March 26, 1871-Jan. 7, 1922).

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

In March, Hawaii celebrates the birthdays of two royalty: Queen Kaahumanu on March 17 and Prince Kuhio on March 26.

More than any other woman in Hawaiian history, Queen Ka’ahumanu effected changes that live on today. She converted to Christianity, learned to read, ordered schools built on all the islands, overthrew the traditional kapu system, created the government position of kuhina nui or co-ruler and more.

Elisabeth Ka’ahumanu was born in a cave in Hana, Maui during the period of war between ruling chiefs. Her name means “feather cloak.” Her mother, Nāmāhana of Maui, married High Chief Ke’eaumoku of Hawai’i Island, Counselor to King Kamehameha I. Promised in marriage to Kamehameha, Ka’ahumanu went to live in the King’s household at an early age and became the King’s favorite wife. After the king died in 1819, Ka’ahumanu created the position of kuhina nui with the king’s young son Liholiho, and thus moved from influence to power.

In 1864, the Ahahui Ka’ahumanu, a royal society of Native Hawaiian women was founded and named after Queen Ka’ahumanu. In September 2004, the president of the Maui chapter sponsored me into the organization. Today, the statewide organization continues to honor the Queen and her legacy.

Prince Kuhio served as Hawai’i’s second congressional delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives for 10 consecutive terms lasting 20 years and led the passage of the Rehabilitation Act that created the Hawaiian Homes Commission in 1921 that set aside almost 200,000 acres for homesteading by Native Hawaiians. He succeeded in obtaining federal funding for the creation of Pearl Harbor and a long list of other Hawaii projects.

Jonah Kuhio Kalaniana’ole was born on Kauai and named after his two grandfathers who were high chiefs of Hilo and Kauai. His mother was Queen Kapi’olani’s sister and his father was the ruling chief of Kauai. After his mother died, Kuhio and his brother David Kawananakoa were adopted by their Aunt Queen Kapi’olani and Uncle King Kalākaua. Prince Kuhio lost his chance of ascending the throne when the Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown in 1893 when he was 22 years-old.

Prince Kuhio was of royal blood and always fought for the welfare of his people. Today his legacy lives on in two Native Hawaiian organizations, the Royal Order of Kamehameha and the Hawaiian Civic Club.

In 1949, the legislature of the Territory of Hawaii established Prince Kuhio Day on March 26 as an official holiday. When Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959, the state continued this recognition which is only one of two state holidays that honor Hawaii’s ali’i on their birthday.

Ukulele players can keep Hawaiian music alive by clicking here.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review Hawaii’s Last Queen Program in January

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Twenty people signed up for Lili’uokalani, Hawaii’s Last Queen, the first program in the new Hawaiian History and Song Series for 2018 on Wednesday, January 31.

Twenty people signed up for Lili’uokalani, Hawai’i’s Last Queen, the first program in my new Hawaiian History and Song Series for 2018 on Wednesday, January 31 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. The focus was on learning about Queen Lili’uokalani, the kingdom of Hawai’i’s last monarch, and the stories behind some of her compositions that we sang and played. Part one lecture took 30-minutes, followed by Part two taking 45-minutes to get through four songs. We omitted one planned song as we ran out of time (had to allow for lunch).

Afterwards, one lady commented how much she enjoyed the singing part of the program because it “made the subject come alive”. Another lady expressed how much she loves learning about Hawaiian history.

Here is the list of 4 songs with my unique ‘ukulele strums that we played:

  1. Queen’s Jubilee – Morse Code Strum.
  2. Ku’u Pua I Paoakalani – Pick in 4 Strum.
  3. Sanoe – Waltz Strum and Pick in 6 Strum.
  4. Hawaii Aloha – Morse Code Strum.

HERE’S HOW TO LEARN THE ABOVE SONGS FROM WHEREVER YOU LIVE:

DOWNLOAD A SINGLE SONG PURCHASE to your digital device. Get the song sheets, video lesson, audio recording, and video story behind the song bundled for one low price.

PURCHASE A PACKAGED SONG SET OF BOOK/DVD/CD. Get the song sheets, video lesson, and audio recording for 6 songs with 8 unique strumming styles to learn off-line.

  1. Nostalgic Hawaiian Songs, Vol. 1 – Sanoe plus 5 other songs for intermediate ‘ukulele players.
  2. Nostalgic Hawaiian Songs, Vol. 2 – Ku’u Pua I Paoakalani, Hawaii Aloha, plus 4 other songs for intermediate ‘ukulele players.

The Hawaiian History and Song series continues on the 5th Wednesdays of the month for the year. The next program is May 30 and is titled State Holidays (about Kuhio Day and Kamehameha Day).

Visit my webpage about classes at Kaunoa and see photos from past classes for more information.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Hawaiian Cowboy Culture and Ikua Purdy Lives On

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

CTY Purdy monument – Famed Big Island cowboy Ikua Purdy pursues a bull in this monumental statue by Fred Fellows of Arizona. The 27-foot-long sculpture is so big that Waimea backers need more time to prepare a base for it. Courtesy of Nancy Martin. 2003 Feb. 23

On February 23, 2003, a flatbed trailer carrying an enormous bronze statue of Ikua Purdy roping a bull was pulled into the Parker Ranch Shopping Center in Waimea on the Big Island. After a blessing ceremony it was pulled back into a warehouse because it was too big for the site. The statue by Fred Fellows of Arizona was 16 feet high and 27 feet long. An alternate site and dedication was expected in June. The Paniolo Preservation Society erected the statue[1].

In 1999, Ikua Purdy was first Hawaiian voted into the National Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame. That same year Purdy was the first inductee to the Paniolo Hall of Fame established by the Oahu Cattlemen’s Association.

In 1908, Purdy stunned the American West at the World Championship finals in Wyoming by winning the steer-roping contest in 56 seconds. Unlike today’s calf-roping, riders lassoed full-grown steers. Eben “Rawhide Ben” Low, owner and manager of Pu’uwa’awa’a Ranch on the Big Island, sent Purdy and two other ranch hands to compete in the Championship. Archie Ka’au’a (Eben’s half-brother) came in second, and Jack Low (Eben’s brother) placed sixth. The three paniolo made a colorful entrance in Cheyenne wearing their vaquero-inspired chaps and hats with flower lei and wowed the spectators with their performances.

Hawai’i had a cowboy culture before the American West. In 1793, British Captain George Vancouver gave Kamehameha a gift of cattle. As the result of a kapu against killing them, by 1830 the wild cattle posed a dangerous threat to humans. In 1823, Kamehameha III hired Spanish-Mexican vaqueros from California to hunt and train Hawaiians to rope and handle cattle. The cowboys spoke Spanish “Espanol” which turned into “paniolo” and the Hawaiian cowboy culture was born. The cattle trade in the American West was at its peak in 1867 until the early 1880s, many years after Hawai’i’s paniolo culture had begun.

Born in 1873 in Waimea on the Big Island, Purdy moved to Maui after the competition and was foreman at Ulupalakua Ranch for many years until his death in 1945 at age 72. He never returned to the mainland to defend his title. His victory and legend live on in rodeo history.[2]

‘UKULELE PLAYERS CAN LEARN TO PLAY the following two paniolo songs the Ukulele Mele Way. Listen to the audio recordings in the free online Fan Club:

  1. Ulupalakua – Click here for this and other Hawaiian songs.
  2. Paniolo Country – Click here for this and other hapa haole songs.

Schedule private webcam lessons and then I will email you the song sheet and teach you how to play it with my unique ukulele strumming pattern. You can play along with the audio recording without needing to sing-along unless you want to.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

[1] http://www.alohacottages.net/ikua_purdy.html [2] http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/ikua-purdy/

Hawaiian History and Song for January

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

The new Hawaiian History and Song program for 2018 debut about Liliuokalani, Hawaii’s last queen, will be Wednesday, January 31 from 9 -11 a.m. at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. Ukulele players welcome to play along.

Lili’uokalani, Hawai’i’s Last Queen is the title of my program for the new Hawaiian History and Song Series for 2018 on the 5th Wednesdays of the month at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. On Wednesday, January 31 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. we will learn about Queen Lili’uokalani, the kingdom of Hawai’i’s last monarch, and her legacy. Plus we will sing some of her compositions and learn the stories behind the songs in keeping with Hawaiian oral history traditions. Participants can follow the song’s lyrics and ‘ukulele chords projected onto the large screen at the front of the room (similar to Sing-Along with Mitch Miller).

All ‘ukulele players are invited to bring instruments to play along as I lead everyone by singing and playing my ‘ukulele while my husband accompanies us on ‘ukulele-bass. Don’t worry if you don’t know the ‘ukulele chords or the unique strumming pattern for the songs. The focus is on learning Hawaiian history, singing the songs, finding out the stories behind them, and enjoying the group experience.

Similar to the new additions in my Sing-Along with Mele Fong series, there is a slide before each song that shows the unique strum graphic (how we play the rhythm) and the chord shapes with finger numbers.

Lunch is optional and a good time to sit around and talk story with like minded people who enjoy Hawaiian history, singing, and playing the ukulele. Kaunoa Senior Center is located in Spreckelsville, Maui.

SIGN UP NOW by calling 808-270-7308.

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KEEP HAWAIIAN MUSIC ALIVE from wherever you live! Click here.

  1. Download Single Song lessons to your digital device
  2. Purchase Packaged Song Sets of book/DVD/CD for Nostalgic Hawaiian songs
  3. Schedule Private Webcam Lessons for feedback
  4. Subscribe to Complete Monthly Online Lessons and learn many Hawaiian songs
  5. Listen to free audio recordings of Hawaiian songs and then schedule lessons to learn how to play them

Whether you are a beginnerintermediate, or advanced ‘ukulele  player, you can have fun learning to play the Ukulele Mele Way from wherever you live!

Aloha, Mele Fong, aka Ukulele Mele

Overthrow of the Hawaiian Monarchy

For January’s Hawaiian history moment of the month, let’s learn about the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy.

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

On January 17, 1893, the Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown by armed American businessmen (not local Hawaiians) in a bloodless coup.

DID YOU KNOW Hawai’i is the only state in the union to have had a monarchy and a royal palace you can visit today? King Kamehameha the Great unified the islands into the Kingdom of Hawai’i in 1810 and it lasted 83 years until the overthrow by non-Hawaiians.

On January 17, 1893, the Kingdom of Hawai’i was overthrown by armed American businessmen and sugar planters in a bloodless coup.  A small group of men under Sanford Dole overthrew Queen Lili’uokalani, the Hawaiian monarch, and established a new provincial government with Dole as president. John Stevens, the U.S. minister to Hawai’i knew about the coup ahead of time, and 300 U.S. Marines from a warship were in Honolulu harbor to allegedly protect American lives.

Queen Lili’uokalani, had tried to establish a new constitution to restore the power she had lost when her brother King Kalākaua was forced to sign the Bayonet Constitution of 1887 that diminished the Native Hawaiian’s voice in government. However, the American businessmen did not want the Queen to succeed. Thus, to this “superior force of the United States of America,” Queen Lili’uokalani yielded her throne, under protest, in order to avoid bloodshed, trusting that the United States government would right the wrong that had been done to her and the Hawaiian people.[1] That did not happen.

“President Grover Cleveland sent a new U.S. minister to Hawai’i to restore Queen Lili’uokalani to the throne under the 1887 constitution, but Dole refused to step aside and instead proclaimed the independent Republic of Hawai’i. Cleveland was unwilling to overthrow the government by force, and his successor, President William McKinley, negotiated a treaty with the Republic of Hawai’i in 1897. In 1898, the Spanish-American War broke out, and the strategic use of the naval base at Pearl Harbor during the war convinced Congress to approve formal annexation. Two years later, Hawai’i was organized into a formal U.S. territory and in 1959 entered the United States as the 50th state”.[2]

Today you can tour Iolani Palace, the only official royal residence in the United States. “Built in 1882 by King Kalakaua, Iolani Palace was the home of Hawai’i’s last reigning monarchs and served as the official royal residence and the residence of the Kingdom’s political and social life until the overthrow of the monarchy in 1893.

Registered as a National Historic Landmark since 1962 and the only official royal residence in the United States, the Palace is one of the most recognizable buildings in Hawai’i. Meticulously restored to its former grandeur, Iolani Palace tells of a time when their Majesties, King Kalakaua and his sister and successor, Queen Lili’uokalani walked the grand halls.”[3]

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

[1] https://www.hawaii-nation.org/soa.html
[2] http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/americans-overthrow-hawaiian-monarchy
[3] http://www.iolanipalace.org/

Mele Kalikimaka is December’s Song of the Month

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

R. Alex Anderson composed Mele Kalikimaka in 1949. This hapa haole song is Hawai’i’s popular Christmas song.

Did you know that the ancient Hawaiians did not celebrate Christmas until after the arrival of the missionaries? Christmas occurred during the Makahiki, the four month period of resting and feasting when ancient Hawaiians honored the earth for giving them plenty to eat. No conflicts or wars were allowed during this time. After the Hawaiian embraced Christianity, it was only natural that they adapted some of the traditions of Makahiki to the celebration of Christmas.

The greeting Merry Christmas was difficult for the Hawaiians to pronounce because English language sounds like “R” in the word merry did not exist in the Hawaiian language. Thus, Mele Kalikimaka is not a literal translation but simply how we say Merry Christmas in Hawai’i.

R. Alex Anderson composed Hawai’i’s popular Christmas song “Mele Kalikimaka” in 1949. He was born in Honolulu in 1884 and composed nearly 200 songs before his death in 1995. As the story goes, in 1949 Anderson was in his office in Honolulu when his secretary, a woman from the mainland, mentioned that she had never heard a Hawaiian Christmas song. Thus, he composed Mele Kalikimaka and it became an enduring classic. Bing Crosby and The Andrew Sisters made one of the earliest recordings on 78 rpm and 45 rpm phonograph records in 1950.

‘Ukulele players can learn to play my arrangement of Mele Kalikimaka for free!

This hapa haole song (Hawaiian style music with English words) is arranged in the key of D with seven chords and uses the Hum Ding-Ah Strum for ‘ukulele. It is Hawai’i’s way to say Merry Christmas to you.

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Ukulele Mele’s arrangement of “Mele Kalikimaka” uses seven chords and the Hum Ding-Ah Strum for ‘ukulele.

FREE BUNDLE gets you four downloadable files:

  • Two-page song sheets with chords and lyrics (no musical notes to read).
  • Video lesson for how to play the song.
  • Video story behind the song in keeping with Hawaiian oral history traditions.
  • Full audio recording for you to join in singing and playing along with professional musicians The Hawaiian Serenaders.

Click to download the single song lesson today!

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele