Ukulele Strumming Workshop October 21

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Ukulele Strumming Workshop with Ukulele Mele is this Saturday, October 21 from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. at the Bailey House in Wailuku, Maui

My monthly ‘Ukulele Strumming Workshop starts the sixth season this coming Saturday, October 21 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hale Ho’ike’ike at the Bailey House in Wailuku. Get an introduction to the joy of making music the Ukulele Mele Way from an experienced educator and professional entertainer with a unique method of forming ukulele chords with minimal muscle strain and strumming styles taught by no one else on Maui. Play fun, sing-along songs while accompanied by a professional ukulele bass player.

Do you play C, F, and G7 chords confidently? Then you will have more fun at this workshop. We will go beyond the chalang-alang strum (even up and down strums) and give you a taste of other rhythm patterns. There is no need to read music as we play songs by ear without looking at music.

After the workshop you can discover ways to continue learning on Maui, online, by single song lesson downloads, and/or by packaged sets of book/DVD/CD for beginners, intermediate, and advanced ukulele players. Visit my website at www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com for information.

Cost for the workshop is $10 or $5 for museum members at the door. Seats are limited so pre-registration is recommended. Register online by clicking here or call me at 808-281-4981 Hawaii Time.

Come and experience how much fun it is to “Watch. Listen. Play. The Ukulele Mele Way.”

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Serenader Show and Ukulele Lesson at Grand Wailea

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

The Hawaiian Serenaders entertained at the Grand Wailea on October 12 for a corporate incentive event

“Thank you for your music” and “You are a good teacher” were some of the comments received after our 2-hour gig including a group ukulele lesson from 5 – 7 p.m. on Thursday, October 12 at the Grand Wailea.

The Hawaiian Serenaders, comprised of my husband Rich on u-bass and myself on ‘ukulele and vocals, entertained 125 people attending their corporate incentive event opening reception. Originally planned to be outside on the Chapel Lawn, the event was moved last minute to the paved covered area outside the ballrooms because of the threat of rain. We were so thankful for this change in venue. We setup our Bose PA system and debut matching headsets which eliminated the need for mics, mic chords, and mic stands.

We were hired because the client found our webpage and forwarded a request to the event planner who then contacted us. They liked our flexibility of providing entertainment and group ukulele lessons if requested. We rented instruments from Mele Ukulele Store in the nearby Shops at Wailea for the group lesson. Since the client did not want to do a pre-signup for lessons, we had no idea how many people would be interested. We were happy when 10 people suddenly appeared and wanted a lesson. In fact, we stayed 30-minutes past our contract time to provide the ukulele lesson. No problem.

Here is the mix of music we performed during the entertainment portion of the program:

  1. Kupa Landing
  2. Hanalei Moon
  3. Medley: Tiny Bubbles/Pearly Shells
  4. Hula o Makee
  5. Lahainaluna
  6. On The Beach at Waikiki
  7. Ka Ulu Wehi O Ke Kai
  8. Medley: Maui Waltz/Pua Lilia
  9. Under the Boardwalk/Palm Tree
  10. Papalina Lahilahi
  11. Lahaina
  12. Lovely Hula Hands
  13. Ulupalakua
  14. Fly Me To The Moon
  15. Girl From Ipanema
  16. Puamana
  17. In A Little Hula Heaven

Many of my arrangements for the songs we performed can be found in my free online Fan Club. Listen to over 100 songs you can learn to play the Ukulele Mele Way with private lessons on Maui or via webcam. No one else teaches my method of forming ‘ukulele chords with minimal muscle strain or strumming unique rhythms on the ‘ukulele.

For more information about our entertainment services:

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Serenader Hula Show for Women Helping Women

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

The Hawaiian Serenaders had 6 hula dancers for our show at the Women Helping Women event on October 14

“Do you have a CD? ” and “Your voice is so good” were some of the comments received after our 1-hour show with 6 hula dancers from 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. on Saturday, October 14 at Queen Ka’ahumanu Center in Kahului.

The Hawaiian Serenaders, comprised of my husband Rich on u-bass and myself on ‘ukulele and vocals, entertained people attending the Women Helping Women-Domestic Violence Prevention event. We were there because one of my ukulele students who dances hula asked us to play music so her hula sisters from Na Kupuna of Kaunoa could participate in the event. It’s for a good cause, so we agreed. We offered our house for one rehearsal together on Monday, October 9 which was the first time we met most of the dancers. The ladies take hula classes from kumu Lucky Cabral at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better (where I also teach ukulele classes and more). After the program, we were treated to lunch with the ladies which was good fun, too.

At the Center we met the new sound person, Kealoha, a young woman who told us she proposed to management the purchase of a new digital sound system – hurray! It is expected to arrive next year. The acoustics around center stage bounces all over the open space so a new sound system with better directed speakers will be a welcome change.

Here is the mix of music we performed (same set we did for Thursday gig at the Grand Wailea):

  1. Kupa Landing
  2. Hanalei Moon – with hula
  3. Medley: Tiny Bubbles/Pearly Shells
  4. Hula o Makee – with hula
  5. Lahainaluna
  6. On The Beach at Waikiki
  7. Ka Ulu Wehi O Ke Kai – with hula
  8. Medley: Maui Waltz/Pua Lilia
  9. Under the Boardwalk/Palm Tree
  10. Papalina Lahilahi – with hula
  11. Lahaina
  12. Lovely Hula Hands
  13. Ulupalakua – with hula
  14. Fly Me To The Moon
  15. Girl From Ipanema
  16. Puamana – with hula

Many of my arrangements for the songs we performed can be found in my free online Fan Club. Listen to over 100 songs you can learn to play the Ukulele Mele Way with private lessons on Maui or via webcam. No one else teaches my method of forming ‘ukulele chords with minimal muscle strain or strumming unique rhythms on the ‘ukulele.

For more information about our entertainment services:

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Review Na Lani Eha Sing-Along Program 2017

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

October’s Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series theme was “Na Lani Eha.” We sang a Hawaiian song from each of the four royal composers known collectively as Na Lani Eha, plus hapa haole songs in between.

“I’d like to take ‘ukulele lessons from you, but I am a caregiver for my mom so it’s hard for me to get away,” commented a lady after my monthly Sing-Along program. No problem. I told her to visit my website and take online lessons from home at her convenience.

New this month, we led a spontaneous play-by-ear session to “Lion Sleeps Tonight” and “My Girl” for ‘ukulele players who came early to the program. My ‘Ukulele Strumming Workshop season starts this month on October 21 at the Bailey House in Wailuku and these two songs are what we have played at past workshops because they are familiar to sing and easy to play with 3-chords of C, F, and G7.

Twenty people signed up for my monthly Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – Na Lani Eha and more on Thursday, October 5 at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. We sang a Hawaiian song from each of the four royal composers known collectively as Na Lani Eha, plus a hapa haole song (in English) in between. The composers were also siblings: David Kalākaua (oldest brother), Lili’uokalani (oldest sister), Miriam Likelike (younger sister), and Lot Leleiohōku (youngest) who lived in the 1800s-early 1900s. They helped to perpetuate Hawaiian music and culture and are patrons of the Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame.

The “Sing-Along with Mitch Miller” format of projecting the song lyrics and ‘ukulele chords on a screen at the front of the room, and having my husband provide the u-bass line to fill in the lower tones to the higher pitched ‘ukulele worked great!

Here are the 9 songs we learned:

  1. By Kalākaua – Koni Au I Ka Wai – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  2. Singing Bamboo – Latin Strum.
  3. By Lili’uokalani – Sanoe – 2 Waltz Strums.
  4. Lovely Hula Hands – I Wanna Rest Strum.
  5. By Likelike – Ku’uipo I Ka He’e Pu’e One – Pick in 4/Latin Strums.
  6. Hukilau – Swing Strum.
  7. By Leleiohōku – Hawaiian War Chant – I Wanna Rest /Latin Strums.
  8. Song of Old Hawaii – Swing Strums
  9. Hawaii Aloha – Morse Code Strum.

HERE’S HOW TO LEARN THE ABOVE SONGS FROM WHEREVER YOU LIVE:

LISTEN TO THE RECORDINGS IN THE FREE ONLINE FAN CLUB and then schedule private lessons on Maui or via webcam to get the song sheets and feedback.

DOWNLOAD A SINGLE SONG PURCHASE to your digital device. Get the song sheets, video lesson, audio recording, and video story behind the song for the song you select.

Stay tuned for the next Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – American Classics on Thursday, November 2 at Kaunoa Senior Center.

Visit my webpage about classes at Kaunoa and see photos from past classes for more.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Na Lani Eha Songs and More For October 2017

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

October’s theme for Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series is “Na Lani Eha and More.” Learn songs by the four royal composers: King Kalākaua, Queen Lili’uokalani, Princess Likelike, and Prince Leleiohōku.

In celebration of the four royal composers: King Kalākaua, Queen Lili’uokalani, Princess Likelike, and Prince Leleiohōku, join us for the next Sing-Along with Mele Fong series: Na Lani Eha and More on Thursday, October 5 from 10 a.m. – noon at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better.  These four siblings were known collectively as Na Lani Eha, meaning The Royal Four. Their musical abilities and patronage of Hawai’i’s musical culture during the last half of the 1800s continues to live on today. Were it not for their cultural leadership and personal contributions in encouraging and supporting aspiring composers, singers, instrumentalists, dancers, chanters and poets, Hawai’i’s significant musical contributions to the world might not have happened.

This program is one of a monthly series that evokes the feeling of sing-along with Mitch Miller programs as the lyrics and ‘ukulele chords are projected on the large screen in the front of room for everyone to follow. ‘Ukulele players are invited to bring instruments to play along as I lead everyone by singing and playing my ‘ukulele while my husband accompanies us on ‘ukulele-bass. Don’t worry if you don’t know the ‘ukulele chords or the unique strumming pattern for the songs. The focus is on singing the songs, finding out the stories behind them, and enjoying the group experience.

Why are people returning? “It’s fun!” is what I’ve heard.

Lunch is optional and recommended as a good time to meet people who enjoy learning the Ukulele Mele Way. Kaunoa Senior Center is located in Spreckelsville, Maui.

SIGN UP NOW by calling 808-270-7308.

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Other learning options with Ukulele Mele:

Whether you are a beginnerintermediate, or advanced ‘ukulele player, you can have fun learning to play the Ukulele Mele Way from wherever you live!

Aloha, Mele Fong, aka Ukulele Mele

Facebook Fridays for Fan Club Fun

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Facebook followers can listen to “Fridays for Fan Club Fun” featuring the audio recording of a song with vocals, ‘ukulele, u-bass and sometimes a drum machine that you can learn to play the Ukulele Mele Way with private lessons from wherever you live.

Starting Friday, September 29, facebook followers can listen to “Fridays for Fan Club Fun” featuring the audio recording of a song with vocals, ‘ukulele, u-bass and sometimes a drum machine that you can learn to play the Ukulele Mele Way with private lessons from wherever you live. The featured song is one of the 100+ in the Hawaiian, hapa haole, pop, and Christmas song categories available for your listening pleasure in the FREE online Fan Club on my website. Join in singing and playing along with professional musicians, The Hawaiian Serenaders.

The first few songs scheduled for Fridays from September 29-October 27 are:

  1. Medley of Maui Boy/Maui Girl with Hum Ding-Ah Strum
  2. Haole Hula with I Wanna Rest Strum
  3. Hukilau with Hum Ding-Ah Strum
  4. Singing Bamboo with Latin Strum
  5. Princess Poopooly with I Wanna Rest/4And Strums

Like my Facebook page and then see the posts on Fridays and more.

Listen to audio recordings in my online Fan Club to select from 100+ songs.

Here is a fun, easy way to build your repertoire one song at-a-time. Learn how to form ‘ukulele chord shapes with minimal muscle strain while strumming rhythm patterns taught by no one else. There is no need to sing and play your instrument at the same time – the audio recording is provided for you. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced ‘ukulele player, you can have fun learning to Watch. Listen. Play. The Ukulele Mele Way.

Listen to the audio recording and select the song to GET STARTED LEARNING TODAY!

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Ukulele Fan Club Song for October

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

You are invited to sing and play along to our arrangement of Haole Hula – the FREE Fan Club’s ‘Song of the Month”.

You are invited to sing and play along to our arrangement of Haole Hula – the FREE Fan Club’s “Song of the Month” for October.  This hapa haole song (Hawaiian style music with English words) was composer R. Alex Anderson’s favorite of the more than 100 songs he wrote. In spite of the worldwide popularity of his song Lovely Hula Hands (which you can also learn to play), the song Haole Hula expresses his love for his island home.

My arrangement of Haole Hula with I Wanna Rest Strum is in the key of C and uses 11 chords. It is perfect for intermediate to advanced ‘ukulele players who want to build their repertoire.

Listen to the audio recording.

Schedule private webcam lessons to learn to play the song from wherever you live.

Why learn the Ukulele Mele Way:

  1. You learn to form ‘ukulele chord shapes with minimal muscle strain while strumming rhythm patterns taught by no one else.
  2. Song sheets with chords and lyrics are emailed to you. There is no need to read musical notes.
  3. Audio recordings are provided for you to play along with professional musicians who sing and play ‘ukulele and u-bass (sometimes with drum machine accompaniment). There is no need for you to sing and play your instrument at the same time.
  4. Lesson on how to play the song with the opportunity to ask questions is given by a professional educator and entertainer with over 50 years of ‘ukulele playing and entertaining experience.
  5. You gain an authentic Hawaiian cultural experience learning to play Hawai’i’s official instrument, the ‘ukulele, from a Native Hawaiian who teaches the old Hawaiian way.

Visit my online Fan Club to listen to over 100 audio recordings of Hawaiian, hapa haole, pop, and Christmas songs you can learn to play the Ukulele Mele Way with private lessons via webcam or on Maui. Select the Fan Club’s Song of the Month or another song.

Have fun learning to Watch. Listen. Play. The Ukulele Mele Way today!

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

Princess Kai’ulani – Hawai’i’s Hope for the Nation

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

The story of Hawai’i’s Crown Princess Ka’iulani is a tale of unfilled promise, dashed dreams and a life cut tragically short. She was second in line to the throne but never became Queen after the overthrow of the monarchy in 1893.

The story of Hawai’’s Crown Princess Ka’iulani is a tale of unfilled promise, dashed dreams and a life cut tragically short. She was second in line to the throne but never became Queen after the overthrow of the monarchy in 1893. Educated in England, Ka’iulani broke the stereotype of Hawaiians being “savage” as she was a tall, slim, and beautiful hapa-haole young woman who wore the elegant Paris gowns and spoke English eloquently as she gave public speeches denouncing the overthrow of her government and pleaded with U.S. President Grover Cleveland to no avail. Ka’iulani was only 23 years-old when she died of pneumonia.

Born on October 16, 1875 during the reign of King David Kalākaua, Victoria Ka’iulani was named for England’s Queen Victoria, a longtime friend of Hawaiian royalty. Her name means “the highest point in heaven” or “the royal sacred one” in the Hawaiian language. Her mother was Miriam Likelike, Kalākaua’s sister, and her father was Scottish Archibald Cleghorn, governor of Oahu.

At birth, Ka’iulani was given an estate called ‘Āinahau in Waikiki by her godmother Princess Ruth, the last surviving member of the Kamehamehas. The estate near the ocean was surrounded by trees and flowers, and peacocks strutted amongst the ponds and footpaths. Ka’iulani was sometimes called the “peacock princess” because of her love for them. In 1899 when Ka’iulani was 13, she met the poet Robert Louis Stevenson, who lived next door and mesmerized her with intriguing tales of the world as they sat in the garden. Stevenson called her “the island rose” in a poem.[1]

Later that year, Ka’iulani’s father sent her away to England to further her education. Ka’iulani’s mother had died two years prior when she was 11.

During her absence, Kai’ulani’s uncle King David Kalākaua died unexpectedly in 1891, and then her aunt Lili’uokalani became Queen and named her heir apparent. Ka’iulani wanted to return home to Hawai’i but the queen would not permit it.

On January 17, 1893, the kingdom of Hawai’i was overthrown by American businessmen backed by U.S. Marines. One of the conspirators was Sanford B. Dole, of pineapple fame who went on to lead the Republic of Hawai’i. U.S. President McKinley had named the Republic of Hawai’i, the formal name of the nation between July 4, 1894 when the Provisional Government of Hawai’i had ended, and August 12, 1898, when the nation was annexed as a territory of the U.S.

Upon hearing news of trouble in paradise, Crown Princess Ka’iulani traveled from England to across the U.S. to denounce the overthrow of her government and the injustice toward her people. She returned to Hawai’i in 1897 to a very different place.

During the Annexation ceremony in 1898, the Princess and her aunt, Lili’uokalani along with other members of the royal family who were now private citizens, wore funeral attire and stayed within Washington Place, protesting what they considered an illegal transaction. .”When the news of Annexation came it was bitterer than death to me,” Princess Kaʻiulani, told the San Francisco Chronicle. “It was bad enough to lose the throne, but infinitely worse to have the flag go down.”.

While horseback riding on the Big Island, Ka’iulani was caught in a rainstorm and fell ill. The cold turned into pneumonia and lingered for months. Kai’ulani and Prince David Kawananakoa (third heir to the throne of the kingdom of Hawai’i) had announced their engagement in 1898, but she died in 1899 before they were married. Ka’iulani was only 23.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kai’ulani

Ukulele Workshop Season Starts October 2017

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Ukulele Strumming Workshop participants can join in with professional musicians who sing and play ‘ukulele and ‘ukulele-bass to fun songs. Register now online.

The 6th season of ‘Ukulele Strumming Workshops resumes Saturday, October 21, 2017-March 2018  at the Bailey House in Wailuku, Maui. New this year the workshops will last one hour from 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. instead of the previously scheduled 2-hours.

‘Ukulele Strumming Workshop participants can join in with professional musicians who sing and play ‘ukulele and ‘ukulele-bass to fun songs. No one else teaches my unique method of forming chord shapes with minimal muscle strain and strumming rhythm styles for the ‘ukulele. Get an introduction to the joy of making music the Ukulele Mele Way from an experienced educator and professional singer/entertainer. Experience the fun of applying new strums to old tunes to make them sound better – all in a group environment.

 

Cost is $10 or $5 for museum members at-the-door and includes admission to see the largest collection of Hawaiian artifacts in Maui County. No other ‘ukulele workshop offers the experience of learning to play Hawai’i’s official instrument, the ‘ukulele, from a Native Hawaiian at a historical Hawaiian place.

Pre-registration is free to save your seat and is highly recommended. This gives us a way to contact you in case the workshop is cancelled at the last moment due to sickness or weather related building closures. Register now online for:

  • October 21, 2017
  • November 18, 2017
  • December 16, 2017
  • January 20, 2018
  • February 10, 2018
  • March 10, 2018

For photos and other general information about the workshop, visit my website. Hope to see you at one of the workshops!

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele

 

Review Island Party Songs 2017

www.UkuleleMeleOnMaui.com

Ukulele Mele on Maui presented “Island Party Songs” for September’s Sing-Along Program at Kaunoa Senior Center

“We go to local parties and now we have a better idea of what they’re singing,” commented recent transplants to Maui.

Twenty two people signed up for my monthly Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – Island Party Songs on Thursday, September 7 at Kaunoa Senior Center for adults 55 and better. We chose the monthly theme to celebrate Aloha Festivals month, a time when each of the Hawaiian Islands celebrates the aloha spirit with festivals.

The “Sing-Along with Mitch Miller” format of projecting the song lyrics and ‘ukulele chords on a screen at the front of the room, and having my husband provide the u-bass line to fill in the lower tones to the higher pitched ‘ukulele worked great!

Here are the 11 party songs we learned:

  1. Medley: Maui Boy/Maui Girl – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  2. The Pidgin English Hula – I Wanna Rest / 4 And Strums.
  3. Manuela Boy – Latin Strum.
  4. E Huli Makou – ‘Ōlapa Strum.
  5. Princess Poopooly – I Wanna Rest / 4 And Strums.
  6. U.S.E.D. – Hum Ding-Ah Strum.
  7. Aloha No Wau I Ko Maka – 2 Waltz Strums.
  8. Keep Your Eyes on the Hands – I Wanna Rest / 4 And Strums.
  9. Medley: Tiny Bubbles/Pearly Shells – Swing/Hum Ding-Ah Strums
  10. Yellow Bird (local style) – Latin Strum.
  11. Hawaii Aloha – Morse Code Strum.

HERE’S HOW TO LEARN THE ABOVE SONGS FROM WHEREVER YOU LIVE:

1. LISTEN TO THE RECORDINGS IN THE FREE ONLINE FAN CLUB and then schedule private lessons on Maui or via webcam to get the song sheets and feedback.

  1. From the Hapa Haole Songs Category – Keep Your Eyes on the Hands, Manuela Boy, Medley: Maui Boy/Maui Girl, Medley: Tiny Bubbles/Pearly Shells, Princess Poopooly, The Pidgin English Hula, U.S.E.D. and Yellow Bird.
  2. From the Hawaiian Songs Category – E Huli Makou.

2. DOWNLOAD A SINGLE SONG PURCHASE to your digital device. Get the song sheets, video lesson, audio recording, and video story behind the song for the song you select.

  1. Aloha No Wau I Ko Maka
  2. Hawaii Aloha

Stay tuned for the next Sing-Along with Mele Fong Series – Na Lani Eha and More  on Thursday, October 5 as we celebrate the four royal composers.

Visit my webpage about classes at Kaunoa and see photos from past classes for more.

Aloha, Mele Fong aka Ukulele Mele